The Mobile Asia Expo is scheduled to be held in Shanghai this year from 20-22 June at the Shanghai New International Expo Centre in Shanghai, China.

Mobile Asia Expo comprises of several components:

  • A world-class Expo, showcasing cutting-edge technology, products, devices and apps to mobile professionals and mobile-passionate consumers
  • A thought-leadership Conference for senior mobile professionals, featuring visionary keynotes, panel discussions and world-class networking
  • App Planet, where app developers can learn and expand their knowledge of the popular mobile app marketplace
  • A unique Deal Hub platform to connect qualified buyers and world class solution providers face-to-face to do business
  • And mPowered Brands, a programme dedicated to accelerating marketers’ knowledge and utilization of mobile as a marketing medium

The expo will have several App developer conferences which will feature keynote presentations, panel discussions, and encourage audience interaction on a wide range of topics.

Normally, 1-Day Visitor Pass is ¥ 100, but you can receive the pass for free during a limited-time “Early Bird” offer. All you have to do us to visit https://registration.itnintl.com/mae12/regonline/RegLogin.aspx and use the code EVP7F747

Notable App developer conferences include

  • Blackberry Jam sessions: Being held on Wednesday and Thursday, 20-21 June, these sessions will help developers fast-track BlackBerry application development and bring apps to the community of over 77 million BlackBerry users worldwide.
  • CMDC ADC: The CMDC ADC will introduce a host of customisable new products as well as keynote speeches on the latest developments in mobile applications and the mobile industry. Taking place on Wednesday, 20 June from 13:30-17:00, this ADC will include a lucky draw at the end of the session.
  • Nokia Developer Day: Nokia’s Developer Day will feature their latest achievements on Windows Phones and the Nokia developer support and incentive program. A special giveaway will be awarded to an attendee at the end of this conference which will take place on Wednesday, 20 June from 15:00-17:00.

Hurry up…Grab while the offer lasts…!!

Happy developing…!!!

Nokia has reigned for 14 years since 1998, when it became the World’s largest handset maker. Nokia overtook Motorola and now it’s time for Samsung to rule the throne.

According to a Reuter’s poll of analysts, the end of Q1 marks the end of the Nokia reign. Samsung is victorious at 88 million devices in comparison to 83 million of Nokia. Although the margin is not huge, the loss of the top spot impact on Nokia is yet to be unraveled.

Let us wait till 27-April for the final Q1 numbers from Samsung and the official announcements for the rise of the new leader.

clip image001 Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

This is Lumia 900- in the teardown performed by the market research firm- IHS iSuppli.

The teardown determined the cost required to build the phone is $209.Now, this is the reason for the launch cost of $99.

Comparison between Nokia Lumia 900 and Samsung Galaxy SII –

clip image003 Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

clip image005 thumb Nokia Lumia 900 versus SGS II   component cost

The credit of the low material cost goes to Nokia, Microsoft and Qualcomm. The processor was only $17 vs $22 used in the Android phones and 512 MB RAM vs 1GB used in the commonly used Android handsets. The cheaper Bluetooth saved $2.50 vs newer ones of the Android handsets.

Microsoft lowered the prices of Windows Phone OS considerably to $5 from $15 to make Nokia Lumia 900 phone available at $209.

Not much of a difference in the BOM of the two, but a big difference in retail price. Sammy can take a few hints from Nokia on pricing though…!!

Microsoft and Nokia have been pretty busy pushing the Windows Phone. With AT&T coming into the picture, the game was quite clear – Lumia 900 was to be AT&T’s new flagship.

We all know that a flagship is something which the carrier/store pushes with all it’s might. But this is not the case with AT&T. As an article points out on CNET, who conducted a secret shopper survey of 5 AT&T stores in Manhattan. They did not find the Nokia Lumia 900 high on the list of recommended handsets. Here is what happened

…But when I asked for advice on buying a new smartphone, sales associates in five different stores in Manhattan actually recommended the Apple iPhone and not the carrier’s latest "hero" device.

Even when I prompted them to tell me more about the Lumia 900, none was willing to recommend it to me for purchase.

"Windows Phone is alright," said an associate in a store on the Upper West Side. "But it’s no iPhone."

This became clear to me when I walked into the AT&T stores and told each associate I encountered that I had never owned a smartphone but was looking to buy my first one. I explained I didn’t have any preconceived ideas about which device I wanted to buy. I told them I was a PC user, who knew little about cell phones and was looking for something easy to use. My main objective for owning a smartphone was to access email, surf the Web and check Facebook.

While all these activities could be easily achieved with a Windows Phone, associate after associate first pushed me to toward an iPhone and then suggested an Android device as my second option.

"For your first smartphone, you should get an iPhone," an assistant manager at an AT&T store told me. "When you get bored with that, you should try an Android phone."

When I asked him about the Lumia 900 and the Windows Phone OS for someone such as myself who had never had a smartphone, he told me he thought it was too complicated. He admitted he hadn’t used the Lumia 900 much. He had only gotten the device a couple of days before the launch on Sunday.

No wonder we will see competition on the east coast between Android and iPhone only.

What happens when a creation is orphaned by it’s creator? A very solid example is given in the following email.

Hello folks,

   I writing this mail to inform you about Necessitas alpha4 release status. When we released alpha 3 we said that will try to release alpha 4 (the last one) till the end of November, but I forgot to mention the most important thing: that we also depend on Nokia to release the sable 4.8, because we can’t guarantee something which is not guaranteed by its creator.

Meanwhile we’ll release new updates for current release which will bring more fixes and improved features. On this occasion I’d like to let you know that I just close the very first (and the oldest) Necessitas issue [1]. It is about virtual keyboard support which I managed to rewrite it and (almost) finish it [2]. There are a few small things which are still missing (I’d like to mention the selection which is not the best in town), but, overall I can say that all Qt users will enjoy a first class experience when it comes to input support. The new implementation will be added to the next update (which will come soon).

Cheers,

BogDan.

[1] http://code.google.com/p/android-lighthouse/issues/detail?id=1

[2] http://commits.kde.org/android-qt/d4853d1ce71e591fc031c0f9e505b814f833e332

Nokia has once again proven that it is utmost wise to drop a technology which the entire developer community thinks to be the missing link. Sad.

When CNET got their hands on Windows Phone (Nokia Lumia 800 to be precise), they were simply awestruck by the balance the platform had to offer. The UI was, well, slick, but was a lot less clunky, as per CNET.

According to the article:

The king is dead

Until not so long ago, that meant Apple. But something insane has happened. Something that we simply wouldn’t have countenanced just three short years ago.

One company makes a beautiful, intuitive, elegant interface, and the other makes a dated, clunky interface. But now it’s Microsoft showing off the thing of beauty, and Apple that’s behind the times. Microsoft is the underdog and Apple is the monolithic, restrictive monopoly. Has the world gone mad?

Sure, the iPhone and iPad interface is still slick and simple. But the shine is gone — iOS 5 looks almost exactly the same as iOS 4. Android showed what you can do when you can truly customise the look and feel of your phone, with its flexible home screens, handy widgets placing information right at your fingertips, and the capacity to alter any feature you like.

I seem to recall an old story, when the only smartphone OS of the time, Symbian, was bashed by everyone. People wanted behemoths of phones. They worshipped a large screen and a powerful processor, only to realise that the duo would eat battery faster. They demanded an app store like no other, only to trial a few apps and then delete them and move on to the next.

Nokia was undeniably the game setter, Apple was the game changer, Android was the turmoil that uprooted everyone, and yet RIM et al were wondering what just happened. This proves the age old proverb – The only thing which is constant is change.

Source

Apple surely has a brand loyalty that every CEO yearns for. According to a research published by GfK,

Some 84 percent of iPhone users said they would pick iPhone also when they replace their cellphone, while 60 percent of consumers who use smartphones running Google’s Android said they would stick with phones using the same software.

Only 48 percent of people using Research In Motion’s cellphones said they would stay loyal to their BlackBerrys, the study showed.

While Apple is the leader at present, the current development on Android, RIM’s BBX and Windows Phones from Nokia are all set to give Apple a tough challenge, according to the report.

The scope for brands to lure customers from rivals has diminished and the richest rewards will go to those providers that can create the most harmonious user experience and develop this brand loyalty

What is noteworthy here that 70 percent of consumers said they would stick with their phones due to their seamless integration of features and access to content. The present and future undoubtedly belongs to the Apps and Internet.

Though the firm interviewed around 4500 people in various countries, it never mentions anything about Symbian or Windows Phones. This is quite surprising as a certain percentage of these 4500 people must be carrying Symbian and Windows phones, which the report fails to mention.

Source

Kantar Worldpanel ComTech has conducted a research on smartphone platforms in the UK and have found out that around half of the UK smartphones have Android of one kind or the other on them.

MBB reports

Android’s share has increased from 29 percent a year ago to 49.9 percent. HTC is leading the way for phone manufacturers using the OS, with 45 percent of Android-based phone sales in the 12 weeks prior to 2 October. Samsung took 38 percent of Android sales with Sony Ericsson contributing 8.5 percent, down from 20.5 percent a year ago.

RIM’s BlackBerry OS is the next most popular smartphone OS, present on 22.5 percent of UK smartphones while Apple’s iOS has 18.5 percent market share, down from 33 percent a year ago. Kantar’s figures were taken before Apple announced the iPhone 4S, a period during which Apple CEO Tim Cook said there had been a significant slowdown of iPhone sales.

While Nokia plummeted from 20 percent last year to 6 percent this year, It’s hopes to gain momentum through the Windows Phone is bleak as Windows Phone managed to bad only a measly 1.4 percent share.

The “bad news for featurephones” is that under half of the UK population (44 percent) owns smartphones, with the growth in sales quickly accelerating. Smartphones made up 69 percent of mobile phone sales during the period.

Kantar Worldpanel ComTech has conducted a research on smartphone platforms in the UK and have found out that around half of the UK smartphones have Android of one kind or the other on them.

MBB reports

Android’s share has increased from 29 percent a year ago to 49.9 percent. HTC is leading the way for phone manufacturers using the OS, with 45 percent of Android-based phone sales in the 12 weeks prior to 2 October. Samsung took 38 percent of Android sales with Sony Ericsson contributing 8.5 percent, down from 20.5 percent a year ago.

RIM’s BlackBerry OS is the next most popular smartphone OS, present on 22.5 percent of UK smartphones while Apple’s iOS has 18.5 percent market share, down from 33 percent a year ago. Kantar’s figures were taken before Apple announced the iPhone 4S, a period during which Apple CEO Tim Cook said there had been a significant slowdown of iPhone sales.

While Nokia plummeted from 20 percent last year to 6 percent this year, It’s hopes to gain momentum through the Windows Phone is bleak as Windows Phone managed to bad only a measly 1.4 percent share.

The “bad news for featurephones” is that under half of the UK population (44 percent) owns smartphones, with the growth in sales quickly accelerating. Smartphones made up 69 percent of mobile phone sales during the period.

IDC has reveled the numbers for the Q3 mobile phone shipments. And as unexpected by few, Nokia is still numero uno.

According to the report

Top Five Mobile Phone Vendors

Nokia reversed a global market share on a sequential basis last quarter thanks to stronger feature phone sales in key regions as well as the clearing of inventory backlogs in traditional strongholds, namely China and Europe, which led to a sharp year-over-year shipment and share decline last quarter. Nokia’s smartphone fortunes could improve in quarters to come now that it has introduced the Nokia Lumia devices, powered by Windows Phone 7, to markets where its brand is still relatively strong and in areas where the company has lost share over the past two years.

Samsung registered double-digit growth compared to the third quarter a year ago and also outpaced the market. The company’s growth was again driven by smartphone sales, such as the Galaxy S2. Smartphone sales were notably higher in emerging markets including China. Samsung outpaced the feature phone market as well in terms of growth. The vendor didn’t close the market share gap on Nokia for the top mobile phone position, but it remains within striking distance.

LG Electronics maintained its position as the number 3 mobile vendor worldwide for the twelfth quarter in a row, but continued soft demand for both its feature phones and smartphones led to volume levels not seen since 2Q 2007. With only a few new devices launched and an aging feature phone portfolio, LG’s warnings of lower year-over-year shipment volume appears to have come to fruition. By the end of the year, LG’s grasp on the number 3 position may be loosened as Apple’s aggressive smartphone campaign takes hold in 4Q 2011.

ZTE jumped into the number 4 position thanks to momentum carried into 3Q 2011 with key devices shipping into strategic regions. In China, ZTE has nearly doubled its smartphone volumes from the previous quarter, while within North America, ZTE’s entry-level voice-centric phones at AT&T have gained greater depth. At the same time, ZTE’s target of 12 million smartphone shipments worldwide in 2011 became more of a reality with the introduction of two new Android-powered smartphones for the North American market.

Apple gained share and posted the third-highest growth rate of any Top 5 vendor but dropped to the number 5 position globally. Global iPhone shipments declined sequentially during the same quarter that company founder Steve Jobs handed the CEO reins to Tim Cook. The decline, not coincidentally, happened as Apple readied itself for the 4S launch, which many waited for. Apple’s ability to upgrade 3GS users to the 4S, for example, and make continued inroads into developing economies, where it has been less successful, will help dictate the company’s smartphone fortunes in the future.

The numbers speak for themselves. What should be noted in the chart below is that while LG is the biggest loser, the Biggest winner is ZTE,  thanks to it’s featurephones sales. If featurephones are removed, then the champ would be Samsung, thanks to its baffling smartphone sales.

IDC q3 stats thumb Q3 worldwide mobile phone numbers, Nokia still rules

Source

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